Additions to our O.A.R. contributors Reply

Editorial by Terry Gaisin
     Lately; the major media has been inconsistent in coverage of things cultural, thus demand for our efforts has increased exponentially. In order to fulfill additional reportage requests, we’ve asked Judith Robinson to assist as associate editor; and recruited the following additions to our contributor list. All possess knowledge and an affection for the arts. We’re fortunate to have them join our family.

David and Jan Richards are consummate music lovers who met at the opera 25 years ago. They both have undergraduate degrees in music—David trained as a pianist and choral director, and Jan as a double-bassist.Reviewers Dave & Jan More…

BRAHMS & FRIENDS; a 5@1st Saturday afternoon Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell

A capacity audience thoroughly enjoyed a 5 at the First concert themed around friendship. Three friends – Rachel Mercer, cello; clarinetist Guy Yehuda, and Peter Longworth, piano offered two pieces written by Brahms for his late-in -ife muse and friend Richard Muhlfeld, plus a contemporary Clarinet Trio titled ‘Among Friends’ by Canadian composer Ka Nin Chan. The concert opened with Yehuda and Longworth playing Brahms Sonata in E flat, Op. 120 No 2. Brahms had already retired when he heard Muhlfeld playing and became interested in writing music for this marvelous instrument, and this particular piece is his final chamber composition.

Mercer; Longwoth & Yehuda; post-concert

Mercer; Longwoth & Yehuda; post-concert

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“OPERA”; an evening at the… (HPO!) Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

Opera, as a genre, seems to have no grey area of fans; it’s a love or hate response. I’m in the former category and have been for as long as I can remember (radio broadcasts from the Met during WWII!).  When Daniel Lipton was artistic director of the Hamilton Opera, his POPERA became a favorite gala evening offering a selection of the most beloved and well-liked arias from the repertoire. Last night, he, and the concept, returned to the Great Hall. It was a super evening.

Austin;Lennox;Lipton;Coolen & Armstrong taking the 1st of many bows

         Austin; Lennox; Lipton ;Coolen & Armstrong taking the 1st of many post-concert bows

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“The CANADIAN BRASS”… still shines Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
          It’s been eight years since the Hamilton Philharmonic invited the nation’s renowned Canadian Brass to perform with the orchestra. That occasion was to introduce the new artistic director of the HPO and according to O.A.R. archives; the quintet shone; but the orchestra wasn’t quite up to par. History repeats itself… the Canadian Brass were superb, the HPO under guest conductor  Scott Terrell was a little ragged, especially during the opening Leroy Anderson medley.

The Canadian Brass onstage with the H.P.O.

                                                                    The Canadian Brass onstage with the H.P.O.

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5 @ the 1st plus Payadora Tango ensemble 1

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
The Toronto quartet, Payadora Tango Ensemble warmed the audience on a cold November afternoon the second of the 5 @ the First 2015/16 series of concerts with tangos from Argentina.   Tango apparently comes in both dance music; either the familiar syncopated rhythm or a more waltz-like variety, or as a performance piece not meant for dancing and Payadora offered the audience all three.  The concert began with a fiery, passionate syncopated tango called ‘Retrato de Julio Ahumada’ by Leopoldo Federico which featured a piano solo in the middle and earned audience appreciation.

The members of the tango ensemble

The members of the Payadora Tango Ensemble

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“MOZART”; HPO consigns an entire concert to him Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor

Poor Wolfgang Mozart; a child prodigy by aged five, he never even got to celebrate his thirty-sixth birthday. Sired by a demanding father he was encumbered by names such as ‘Chysostomus’; ‘Theophilus’ and Amadeus. Preferring to go by the latter; he then had the misfortune to have that name utilized as the title in an overly embellished 1984 Milos Forman movie that depicted him as a childish fool. 41 symphonies; 15 masses; 25 piano concerti and the same number of string quartets & over half a dozen operas… not too shabby for only three decades!

Sitarski; Luk & Taurins interpreting Mozart

Sitarski; Luk & Taurins interpreting Mozart

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