An EARNEST endeavour that was vitally important Reply

Review by Michael PiscitellireviewerMichael P2

Oscar Wilde is one of my favourite playwrights and The Importance of Being Earnest is my all-time favourite play ever. So, naturally, when I saw that Hart House’s season would be opening with it, I was jumping up and down in my seat on the bus and getting several strange looks from the normal people around me.
Keeping with the late Victorian era of style, costume designer Ming Wong kept everything within the normal sense of fashion. However, that was the only part of the show that was kept in any sense of the word “normal”. *

the earnest cast-members of Hart House!

the earnest cast-members of Hart House!

More…

“THE GENTLEMAN CLOTHIER”; ‘Lighthouse’ Shines Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
               Even a supposed maven can occasionally overlook a gem. ‘Methought’ Port Dover was strictly the locale for affordable yellow perch, except for the Friday 13th, biker extravaganzas. Nope, it’s also home to the LIGHTHOUSE THEATRE, a 3½ decade-old professional operation which attracts thespians of the highest echelon and audiences willing to drive distances each way to attend its more than just competent offerings. Norm Foster’s newest comedy, “THE GENTLEMAN CLOTHIER” premiers at the Lighthouse and epitomizes its superlative standards.   Photo courtesy of Adam Veri

Hodgson & Fabiilli annoying Brian Paul

Hodgson & Fabiilli annoying Brian Paul

More…

“Kiss Me Kate”; ‘just misses the-lips’ 1

Review by Danny Gaisinreviewer_Danny

In 1948, composer Cole Porter re-established himself as Broadway’s biggie with the staging of Kiss Me Kate. His previous success had been “Anything Goes” fifteen year earlier. Unlike the Gershwin’s; Rogers & Hart; Adler & Ross; the Lerner/Lowe duo; Kander & Ebb and especially the Rogers &Hammerstein II collaboration; Porter also wrote his own lyrics … some were doozies. His ironic Kate’ number about ‘brushing up on one’s Shakespeare’ still gleans giggles. Rhyming “flatter her” with ‘Cleopaterer’ or “clothes mussing” with ‘much ado about nussing’ may not quite scan – but who cares!

The 'Paduans' performing "TAMING" in "Baltimo"

The ‘Paduans’ performing “TAMING” in “Baltimo”

More…

“THE MOUNTAINTOP” – reaches the pinnacle Reply

Review by Judith RobinsonreviewerJudith Robinson
Kevin Hanchard, hits it way out of the ballpark, as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in The Mountaintop at the Shaw Festival. The actor gives a 105-minute non stop, performance at fever pitch , acting out King’s last torturous hours at the Lorraine Motel. The play is not easy to watch. Hanchard begs and pleads for more time, his body broken, his mind scattered and his hope dwindling. Somehow he knows, while smoking and phoning God, that this day will be his last.
Photo by David Cooper

Hibbert &  Hanchard, "@ The Mountaintop"

Hibbert & Hanchard, “@ The Mountaintop”

More…

“The PHILANDERER” – option 1 Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
               Shaw’s semi-biographical ‘The Philanderer’ offers insights not only into the man’s life, but also his attitudes & values. Lisa Peterson’s direction offers as many questions as it does – answers. Written with two endings, due to the social standards of the period, Peterson has chosen to present the original and more scandalous final act, thus bucking the customary conventionality. Good for her… it’s much more interesting and definitely better theatre. Peterson sees humour even in the heartbreaking moments.  Photo by David Cooper

O'Connell; Rand & McLean...Philandering

O’Connell; Rand & McLean…Philandering

More…

“THE SEA”, a new SHAW undertaking Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
                    The play was written in 1973, but takes place in a British seaside town circa 1907. Like “Seascape”, THE SEA’s setting IS right there – beside and actually in it. A storm; an overturned punt, one survivor and one missing – presumed drowned. The effect on the survivor and the townspeople becomes a microcosm of societies’ strata; inter-involvement; philosophies and especially community. Director Eda Holmes takes the putty and sculpts a fascinating portrait of life.
Photo by David Cooper

The Sea -Shaw

Galligan being berated by REID,; witnessed by Jamieson

More…