“The Philanderer” – option 1 Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
               Shaw’s semi-biographical ‘The Philanderer’ offers insights not only into the man’s life, but also his attitudes & values. Lisa Peterson’s direction offers as many questions as it does – answers. Written with two endings, due to the social standards of the period, Peterson has chosen to present the original and more scandalous final act, thus bucking the customary conventionality. Good for her… it’s much more interesting and definitely better theatre. Peterson sees humour even in the heartbreaking moments.  Photo by David Cooper

O'Connell; Rand & McLean...Philandering

O’Connell; Rand & McLean…Philandering

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“THE SEA”, a new SHAW undertaking Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
                    The play was written in 1973, but takes place in a British seaside town circa 1907. Like “Seascape”, THE SEA’s setting IS right there – beside and actually in it. A storm; an overturned punt, one survivor and one missing – presumed drowned. The effect on the survivor and the townspeople becomes a microcosm of societies’ strata; inter-involvement; philosophies and especially community. Director Eda Holmes takes the putty and sculpts a fascinating portrait of life.
Photo by David Cooper

The Sea -Shaw

Galligan being berated by REID,; witnessed by Jamieson

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“KING LEAR”, another Stratford mega-effort Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
               [Cordelia]- “Nothing my Lord”; [Lear] -Nothing? [Cordelia] -”Nothing”. [Lear] “nothing will come of nothing, speak again”.
This pithy dialogue from Act I, scene I of Shakespeare’s KING LEAR foretells the tragedy that not only befalls its two protagonists, but the play’s parallel study of Gloucester and his offspring. Unless you, dear readers grew up in a mirror image of ‘Father Knows Best’ or another saccharine sitcom of the 60’s; “Lear” will touch home! Photo courtesy of David Hou

Feore (Lear) & Repo-Martell (Regan) empathizing

Feore (Lear) & Repo-Martell (Regan) empathizing

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“Hay Fever”; bad for this critic’s allergies Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
reviewerDGcolor                    A successful Noel Coward play and Cynthia Dale in a drawing room comedy; what could miss? How about the over-effeminizing of all the characters; even the females? How about over-posturing ad absurdum? How about overacting to the point of hamminess? Finally, why did director Alisa Palmer feel it is necessary to sledgehammer the point that families can be dysfunctional? Our nearest seatmate dozed off about 12 minutes after curtain and slept until intermission!

non-sneezibng hosts & guests of "HAY FEVER"

non-sneezing hosts & guests of “HAY FEVER”

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“Alice +her Looking Glass, @ Stratford Reply

Review by Terry GaisinreviewerETG

If you are a Crossword [or Jeopardy©] fan, Charles Dodgson was the real Lewis Carroll. His three fantasies became part of every child’s bookcase. Stratford director Jillian Kelley has opted for a consideration of the humorous aspects of the tale rather than the subtle philosophies of the original. Obviously aimed towards a young-ish audience, she still manages to include some props and situations that will tickle the parents or grand-parenting accompaniers.  Photo courtesy of Erin Samuell

Alice,  tea-partying with the gang from behind the mirror

Alice, tea-partying with the gang from behind the mirror

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MAN OF La MANCHA, IMPOSSIBLY POWERFUL Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
                    The Wasserman/Leigh/Darion collaboration takes the story of Cervantes and the end 15th century Inquisition and puts all the drama into music. The theme song and such arias as “Little bird, little Bird”;” Dulcinea” and the touching “A little gossip” all have become standards even out of context. An appreciative director; a professional orchestra and a talented cast and the result can’t be anything BUT another Stratford hit.
Photo courtesy of  Michael Cooper

Ross; Hutton & Rooney - incarcerated

Ross; Hutton & Rooney – incarcerated

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