A Lovely Sunday For Creve Coeur; & at SHAW Reply

Review by Judith RobinsonreviewerJudith Robinson
Tennessee Williams’ female characters are always well drawn out, strong and three-dimensional. This is certainly true of the four characters in this year’s lunch hour show at the Shaw Festival—A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur.    Deborah Hay was fabulous in ‘Cabaret’, but she’s even better in Creve Coeur as the misguided, fragile Dorothea—a 1930’s teacher who gets romantically involved with a cavalier principal.            Photo by David Cooper – SHAW

Hay, Molnar, Hennig & Harwood in CREVE COEUR

Hay, Molnar, Hennig & Harwood in CREVE COEUR

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Toronto Fringe – 2014 3

Our O.A.R. team was able to cover 35 entries (with 3 still to come) of Toronto Fringe 2014. There were a few duds, but overall, the quality; effort, and most-of-all professionalism of the offerings were the equal of the TorFringe administration itself. Many of these submissions deserve an opportunity to extend their runs, and some showed enough promise as to progress mainstream.
For the 2015 Fringe, our reviewing protocol will be to cover only those productions that extend a request and offer ‘courtesy’ (read ‘comps) beforehand.
Terry Metter, editor
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“The Philadelphia Story”; Appearance is everything 1

Review by Judith Robinson @ SHAWreviewerJudith Robinson
                Playwright Philip Barry makes a mockery of the upper classes in the Philadelphia Story. First produced in 1939, and made into an award-winning movie starring Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart, it’s a wonderfully written spoof on life at the top—a well-crafted sermon on the amorality of affluence and a celebration of life without limits. It’s entertaining, thought-provoking and funny.
In order for the play to work really well, the timing has to be just right and the actors need to play off each other with a passion on the edge of madness.  Photo courtesy of David Cooper

Philadelphia Story                       Major Cast members of THE PHILADELPHIA STORY, interacting More…

“Arms and the Man” a new take by Panych Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor

Toronto has a classical radio station that still referring to itself as “new”; that we caustically condemn as Classic-Lite due to the format of book-ending a symphonic movement [never a full symphony]with a dozen commercials at each end. Obviously, newer ain’t always better. However, SHAW’s director Morris Panych has improved on JBS’s ARMS & THE MAN by honing some of the playwright’s political polemics and concentrating on the nuances of war approval in spite of its intrinsic horrors; plus the human aspect of hating a military adversary, but not a specific individual therein.             Photo by David Cooper  

Happer, Somerville, Besworth and Browning; arguing

Happer, Somerville, Besworth and Browning; arguing

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“When we are Married”, SHAW’s & Priestley’s take Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin: (at The Prince of Wales, N.O.T.L.)
                    J.B. Priestley had an insightful sense of humor. He appreciated the perversities of life as well as its ironies. Both of these anomalies are amply displayed in his “WHEN WE ARE MARRIED”, [still in Previews] which comedically analyzes three couples who are celebrating their same-date 25th anniversary…except the minister may have been unauthorized. A second chance, or a need to re-confirm –aye, there’s the rub! SHAW’s talented director Joseph Ziegler manages to capture all the comedy as well as the social nuances of the era and society.   Photo courtesy of David Cooper

The hats come off, and the s*+t is about to hit the proverbial fan

The hats come off, and the s*+t is about to hit the proverbial fan

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Hard to be charitable about ‘CHARITY’ 1

Review by Judith Robinson

The Charity That Began At Home at the Shaw Festival is a rollicking satire on upper-class philanthropy. It makes fun of the reasons why the rich are kind to the poor and emphasizes the profound differences between the social classes in a manner only the British can do. But this is not John Clease. Although Fawlty Towers makes me roll in the aisles, St John Hankin’s play from 1906, doesn’t.      Photo courtesy of David CooperCharity @ SHAW More…