H.P.O. – trumped by an ‘ACE’ Reply

by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
                Season 2013-’14 of the Hamilton Philharmonic reflected a procedural change that went against classical tradition. A neat idea – having the major work offered before the interval and the guest soloist on-stage after break was innovative and also proved to be serendipitous. The audience departed with memories of Jon Kimura Parker’s Rachmaninoff; rather than Sommerville’s HPO reading of the Brahms 3rd Symphony!

Parker performing Rachmaninoff with the HPO

Parker performing Rachmaninoff with the HPO

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“Bone Cage”: Hart House’s environmentalist opening work Reply

Review by Michael PiscitellireviewerMichael P

              Bone cage is a story of an alcoholic forestry worker, Jamie portrayed by Nathan Bitton, who is regularly tormented by the fact that he is trapped in his dead-end town, and dead-end job, with no means of escape from the brutality and cruelty done to nature daily by his own hand.  Throughout the play we meet his dysfunctional and broken family that all have their own cages of grief, anger, revenge, and broken heartedness that all of them must live with.

the protagonists of 'BONE CAGE'

the protagonists of ‘BONE CAGE’

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Two periods; two diverse works- “5@1st Reply

by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
               The name “5 at the First” is a clever acknowledgement of its usual numerical complement and its performance location at the Unitarian church on Dundurn. Last evening, it was Six @ the 1st. and they were an impressive half-dozen. Violinists Yehonatan Berick & Csaba Koczo; Caitlin Boyle and Theresa Rudolph –violists and the Rachel’sDesoer & Mercer – celli; made quite a team. Performing Mozart & Schoenberg offered two ends of a musical spectrum.

Koczo, Berick, Desoer, Mercer,Boyle & Rudolph

Koczo, Berick, Desoer, Mercer,Boyle & Rudolph

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Blair Steals the Show in “Guys and Dolls” Reply

By Judith Robinson

Blair The guy to talk about in the Shaw Festival’s production of Guys and Dolls is Kyle Blair. Fresh from playing the leading lady, Sarah Brown, at the Mady Theatre in Barrie last fall; this young actor knows the production well—you could say inside out. Now he gets a chance to play the leading man—gambler Sky Masterson who lights up a production that could hardly be called dull.
                  What’s in the Daily News; I’ll tell you what’s in the Daily News ♪. The tinhorns check out the ‘Morning Line’. Guys and Dolls; SHAW '13Photo by David Cooper  More…

Essential Questions- “Wife for Life” &“Trifles” Reply

By Judith RobinsonreviewerJudith Robinson

Loss is the theme that unites the two one act plays in the Shaw Festival’s lunch time program—loss of life, loss of sanity, loss of relationship, loss of friendship. The main characters in Eugene O’Neill’s Wife for a Life and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles struggle to survive when things they value are taken away from them, and they are haunted by the regret of what they could have done.     Photo courtesy of  Michael Cooper

l-r: Molnar,Harwood, Irving, Somerville & Campbell

l-r: Molnar,Harwood, Irving, Somerville & Campbell

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Enchanted emancipation –“Enchanted April” at Shaw Reply

Review by Judith Robinson

Matthew Barber’s adaptation of Elizabeth von Arnim’s 1922 novel, Enchanted April, is seamless. The writing flows eloquently from beginning to end. While 21st Century audiences may not find the actions of the two British main characters, Lotty and Rose, played by Moya O’Connell and Tara Rosling all that scandalous—for their time—running away from their husbands to vacation alone, was nothing short of revolutionary (think ‘Thelma and Louise’).
  Photo by David Cooper

Moya O'Connell enjoying an ENCHANTED APRIL

Moya O’Connell enjoying an ENCHANTED APRIL

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