5 @ the First – Sunny Music for a Spring Afternoon Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
       String Extravaganza V was the penultimate concert in the 5 @ the First series – featuring Yehonatan Berick & Csaba Koczo on violin, Caitlin Boyle & Theresa Rudolph on the viola, and cellists Rachel Desoer & Rachel Mercer. Livia Coburn, a Bachelor of Music student at the University of Toronto currently studying under Shauna Rolston, opened with the prelude and gigue from Bach’s Suite #3 in C major on the cello. She is a very accomplished cellist and played the Bach with technical ability and understanding.

guest soloist Livia Coburn, post-concert

Guest soloist Livia Coburn; post-concert

More…

H.P.O.’s season finale – the Tchaikovsky 4th. Reply

Review by Ailine Hessreviewer Ailine Hess
      The Hamilton Philharmonic closed its season last evening, April 16, 2016, with an audience pleasing finale of Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony in f minor.  The concert was conducted by Eric Paetkau, a guest for the evening.  Maestro Paetkau is regularly the Music Director of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra and is the Founder and Music Director of group of 27, a Toronto ensemble.  He has wide experience in leading Canadian ensembles and his musical strengths were amply exhibited in last night’s concert.
The programme opened with a performance of Elgar’s 1892 Serenade for Strings in e minor.

The conductor in a studious & pensive moment

The conductor in a studious & pensive moment

More…

“The World of Dufay according to MUSIKAY” Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
            The historical period familiarly called ‘The Renaissance’ ran from the 14th to 17 centuries and supposedly began in Italy. linking the Middle ages with modern history and reflected a nostalgia for the ancient Greek philosophical era, its artistic nostalgia emphasized humanism establishing definitive customs and conventions on society. Musically, one of the foremost proponents of the new ‘school’ was Guillaume Dufay. The bastard son of a priest, he became famous for his masses, hymns and magnificats sung during Vespers – formats clerically known as antiphons.

The MUSIKAY choir and (young) composer Loic Potvin

The MUSIKAY choir and (young) composer Loic Potvin

More…

“Dialogues of Leopold & Loeb” a philosophical study 1

Review by Terry GaisinreviewerETG
            Guilt by association is an historical phenomenon. Jews were (and still are) blamed for the crucifixion; all Germans felt the loathing resulting from the conviction of Hauptmann for the Lindburgh kidnapping; and every Italian gleaned aversion after the executions of Sacco & Vanzetti. The Trials of Richard Loeb and Nathan Leopold added fuel to latent anti-Semitism of the twenties, especially as it added credence that Jews were rich and entitled. Thus, another analysis into their rationale for such an action touched home.     Photo by Amir Gavriely

Loeb making a point to Nathan Leopold

             Richard Loeb making a point to Nathan Leopold

More…

“GRAND HOTEL, the musical”; another Sheridan hit! Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
            “I vant to be alone”: – like ‘play it again, Sam’; ‘Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn’; “Go ahead -make my day” and ‘Nobody puts Baby in a corner’; another one of those movie quotes that have become iconic. ‘Alone’ was Greta Garbo’s most famous line from the 1932 GRAND HOTEL flick she made with Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery & two Barrymores.
The Robert Wright & George Forrest musical version is the latest blockbuster by Theatre Sheridan.  From the almost overwhelming opening number until final curtain, the musical version is a spell-binder.

Staff & residents of Berlin's GRAND HOTEL, circa 1932

Staff & residents of Berlin’s GRAND HOTEL; circa 1932

More…

VALENTINA LISITSA champions Russian music! Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
       There was an air of excitement at Koerner Hall, on April 9th, even before the solo concert by Valentina Lisitsa. The ‘sold out’ sign was not the only indicator. There was a long line-up for rush seats; the security presence was higher than usual; and the crowds milled around the entrance hall and café with heightened expectation.   The Internet sensation was here. Lisitsa rose from a career going nowhere when she decided to put her recording of the 24 Chopin Etudes, on YouTube, in 2007. Her self-promotion has been the poster-child of the power of the cyber world.

Maestra Lisitsa in performance

Maestra Lisitsa in performance

More…