Stylus Fantasticus interpreted by two groups Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell
            Hammer Baroque presented the Rezonance Ensemble in an afternoon of Stylus Fantasticus from the seventeenth century. Stylus Fantasticus is the 1650’s version of jazz. Previously, instruments were used to accompany voices or keep time for dances, but the new style was described as ‘the most free and unrestrained method of composing, bound to nothing, neither to any words nor to a melodic subject’, and it was instituted to display genius’ and showcase just what instruments could do. After all this was the time of the great violin makers – Amati & Stradivarius – and they were not built to play second fiddle to a singer or dancer.

                   Benjamin Stein & his ‘theorbo’

More…

“SIBELIUS” a ‘New’ H.P.O. scrutiny Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
Finnish composer Jan Sibelius lived from the mid-19th to mid twentieth century. A passionate anti-Nazi, legend has it that he composed his ‘Finlandia’ after ludicrously firing his pistol at an overhead Luftwaffe fighter plane. His final work, Symphony No. 7, is uncharacteristic in that the work is played as a single movement, although the tempi coincidently varies through seven diverse rhythmic ranges. To underscore the evocative themes, The Hamilton Philharmonic utilized the vehicle of PowerPoint™ projections featuring photographs of the flora & fauna of Bruce Trail.

The HPO; Lau’s composition; & Lake Moraine – projected on-screen

More…

Oakville Chamber Orchestra, a “smorgasbord” Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
Given that the intermission pastries were from the town’s Danish Bakery; using the ‘’ term for a wide range or variety of something seems a apropos. The O.C.O.’s concert at St. John’s had something for every taste…classical music; new compositions; operatic arias and popular standards. Almost all had an Oakville story or a connection. The opening work was a recently discovered piece by the late Amice Calverley; an Oakvillian with almost ‘Rambo’ résumé. War hero, archeologist; film maker; impresario; re-builder and composer. The work was conducted by Charles Demuynck of Oakville!  The audience also heard a premiere of his own new composition.

Sitarski performing the Mozart Andante Cantabile movement

Sitarski performing the Mozart Andante Cantabile movement

More…

“Sound the Trumpet”; Trump beats Clinton! Reply

Review by Judith Caldwellreviewerjudy

Sound the Trumpet …and Violin! was the latest in the 5 at the First Concert Series at First Unitarian Church. Bethany Bergman, violin and her husband trumpeter Michael Fedyshyn, joined Angela Park, piano and cellist Rachel Mercer, for an extremely varied afternoon of music. The afternoon began with a 14-year-old Natalie O’Donnell, a pupil of Fedyshyn, playing Sonata in G minor by Handel. O’Donnell showed astonishing mastery of her instrument for one so young, she had excellent control and ease of breathing but she also had a very mature respect for the music and played the difficult presto passage very smoothly.

The group "sounding the trumpet" -music NOT politics

The group “sounding the trumpet” :-music NOT politics

More…

Hammer Baroque’s Valentine subject – ‘Amore’ Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
            Hammer Baroque’s February concert was ‘Amore’. It consisted of madrigals from Renaissance England and Italy sung by Capella Intima with lutenist Magdalena Tomsinska. Capella Intima is a quartet of singers, soprano Sheila Dietrich, tenor Bud Roach, alto Jennifer Enns Modolo and baritone David Roth who perform frequently at Hammer Baroque. Most of the works presented were Sixteenth Century pieces with John Dowland, Philippe Verdelot, John Wilbye & Jacques Arcadelt the most prominent composers.
The afternoon began with a lovely polyphonic invitation from Dowland for love to ‘come again’.

Tomsinska; Dietrich; Erms Modolo; Roach & Roth

    Singers -Tomsinska; Dietrich; Enns Modolo; Roach & Roth

More…

MUSIKAY; seems Renaissance music doesn’t attract 1

Review by Judith Caldwellreviewerjudy
            Love is in the air in February and Musikay offered a concert of 15th and Sixteenth century love songs in the form of madrigals and chansons. The setting of the concert was unusual in that a circle of approximately 30 chairs in the huge atrium of St. Thomas the Apostle Church surrounded the musicians who formed a smaller inner circle. Maestro Stephan Potvin explained that when this music was originally performed the singers would all be reading from one manuscript and so would be very close together so they could see and hear each other thus really helping the polyphonic singing.

Oakes; Ball; McCormack; Potvin; Stachow & Taylor; post-concert

Oakes; Ball; McCormack; Potvin; Stachow & Taylor; post-concert

More…