Cinema Serenade”; Perlman & the TSO 1

Review by Sylvie Di LeonardoReviewerSylvie2               

As I buttoned my coat and struggled to get into my boots, my little brother asked me why I was headed to hear Cinema Serenade with Itzhak Perlman and the TSO this evening at Roy Thompson Hall. “Are they playing along with the movies?” No.  “Is it a shadow cast?” No. “Why would you want to go hear the songs, then?” He had a point. Why spend my day off on the highway at rush hour? “It’s like watching reruns,” he says. I consider this, and again—he had a point. But, I like watching reruns.   Photo by Jag Gundu – T.S.O.

Perlman, Oundjian & the T.S.O.

Perlman, Oundjian & the T.S.O.

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Bach Elgar choir, a change-of-pace concert Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
Last evening, Hamilton’s Bach Elgar Choir deviated from their usual fare to offer a concert of Canadian folksongs. The Choir was led by Alexander Cann and accompanied by Krista Rhodes, piano and flautist Susan Edmonds. The first half was of older, more traditional songs – most over 200 years old – and began with a Huron Dance Song which sounded very familiar to us in Southern Ontario with its traditional drum beat and words with no meaning sung to reinforce the beat. Then on to a 1919 shipwreck song from Newfoundland which honoured the Captain for grounding the ship and thus avoiding loss of life.

the Bach-Elgar ensemble in performance

the Bach-Elgar ensemble in performance

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HAMMER BAROQUE, a talented musical nonet Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
Since the ARTS REVIEW started critiquing its presentations, word has definitely spread about the calibre of the Hammer Baroque series of concerts. There was a near capacity crowd for the Toronto Consort’s Hamilton performance of music from the court of the Italian Queen of France – Catherine de Medici (1519-’89). Catherine was the daughter of a French noblewoman, Madeleine de la Tour d’Auvergne, and Lorenzo de Medici and she was married at a young age to a French Prince who unexpectedly became King of France. As Queen, she was viewed with suspicion because of her Italian heritage, and derision because her father was ‘just a banker’, even though he was wealthier than the King.

the nonet (9-member) team of HAMMER BAROQUE

the nonet (9-member) team of HAMMER BAROQUE

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HPO’s tribute to the ‘Swing’ era…my times Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
Do the names ‘Dorsey; Goodman; Miller; Ellington; Shaw and Basie’ ring some reminiscent bells? If they do, you’re probably mature enough to remember the “Big Band Era” or SWING! As yours truly sits down to write this, my set of drum sticks ‘stolen’ from Gene Krupa, and some ancient pop-music trumpet sheets ‘borrowed’ from Eldridge are sitting on the desk, probably peering phantom-like over my shoulder. Incorporating 2/4 & 4/4 time; oversized orchestras and celebrity conductors; attending a ball or dance where any of these were performing was pure ‘crème de las crème apex society.

Vanhwvel (aka ol' Blueeyes) belting "Night & Day"

Vanhevel (aka ol’ Blue eyes) belting out “Night & Day”

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Novel concert by “5@First” … Jazz Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
            For a total change of pace from their usual classical concerts, Five at the First offered jazz in the form of the Darren Sigesmund Strands Ensemble for the October concert. The ensemble is a Septet consisting of bandleader and composer of the music Darren Sigismund, trombone; vocals by Valeria Matzner; Luis Deniz, alto sax; vibraphonist Michael Davidson; Reg Schwager, guitar; Jim Vivian on bass and percussionist Ethan Ardelli, each of them has an impressive resume and musical credentials and some have worked with such jazz greats as Diana Krall and Peter Appleyard, so the talent on stage was impressive.

the STRANDS ENSEMBLE; post-concert

the STRANDS ENSEMBLE; post-concert

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‘Alleluya’-MUSIKAY’s first Hamilton offering Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
             Anyone who likes sacred Renaissance music should have been at St. Thomas the Apostle Church in Waterdown on Saturday evening when Musikay presented a program titled “Alleluya” for 4 a capella voices.  Unfortunately, a rather sparse audience found their way there which may have been because this was Musikay’s first concert in the Hamilton area or it may have been because there are no obvious external signs that this church is actually St. Thomas’.  Hopefully more people will attend in future.
The voices belonged to Brenda Enns, soprano; alto Catherine McCormack; Nick Gough, tenor; and Terrance Ball, bass with Maestro Stephane Potvin conducting.

Musikay's soloists: -Enns; McCormack; Gough & Ball

Musikay’s soloists: -Enns; McCormack; Gough & Ball

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