“CHICAGO, the Musical”; much better than the movie! Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
We watched the 2002 movie version of the Kander & Ebb musical for one reason only, it was shot in Toronto using the Distillery District, City Hall; Casa Loma ; Osgoode & Canada Life among others. As for the Gere/Zellweger/Zeta-Jones performances, we thought that they were not only two-dimentional, but it wasn’t just the singing that was dubbed – so was their portrayals. Last night we saw Theatre Ancaster’s version and had decided , even by intermission that this is a surefire O.A.R. ‘Top Ten for this year!
Everything about ‘Chicago’ is first rate…the direction; the stage method; the cutaways; costuming and especially the faultless chorus numbers that are an intrinsic part of the show.

Lapsley prepping Pike for her day in court, while chorus & Press folks look on

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“A funny Thing happened on the way to the Forum” by EMP 6

Review by Danny Gaisin
Disclaimer:- I’m not a fan of Sondheim (boring & repetitious) but his 1962 fun musical ‘A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM’ is the exception. Roughly based on a 2nd C. BC play ; it tells the convoluted story of a Roman slave who hopes to win his freedom by helping his master’s son get the girl . The original play starred Zero Mostel as the conniving ‘Pseudolus’, who (sort of) reprised the character-type 5 years later abut updated 2200 years, his The Producer-ing ‘Bialystock’ is also a major scammer.
The introductory number is titled ‘Comedy Tonight’ and its certainly descriptive of the
Etobicoke Musical Prod’ effort.

the denizens of Rome, circa 250BC, aka – cast of FUNNY THING HAPPENED!

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“Grand Hotel- the musical”; smoke & mirrors Reply

Review by Terry Gaisin
Vicky Baum’s 1929 book that utilizes the vehicle of a luxurious Weimar hotel to outline some interacting plots, attracted Robert Wright, George Forrest & Luther Davis to reprise the success of their ‘KISMET’ and retell Baum’s story as a musical. The result is a fascinating piece of theatre that demands acting; singing and terpsichore talents from every cast-member. SHAW’s Eda Holmes direction emphasizes the play’s visual impact but does not sacrifice the intricacies of the various plot lines. She subtly leads her audience to subconsciously anticipate the reversal of status-quo that will befall the world in the next decade.   Photo courtesy of David Cooper

Daly & Therriault celebrating a windfall at the GRAND HOTEL

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Hamilton’s Festival of Friends; No. 42 Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
We Gaisins have been Hamiltonian for a decade, but studiously avoided attending our city’s annual ‘Festival of Friends’; having erroneously thinking it was a Quaker religious retreat!. Nope, no affiliation with the 17th century Anglican offshoot started by George Fox. Instead, its an opportunity for neighbours to meet outdoors and have free access to music, creative arts, food, drink, and political candidate or organizational affiliation booths. One group of regulars even mentioned that back in their dating dates, it was a super ‘pick-up’ opportunity!
For us, this was an occasion to get out the tandem and bicycle over…something we old farts are usually looking for excuses NOT to utilize.

Sunday in the park…in Hamilton!

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“ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW” visits the Wild Side Reply

Review by Marion Davis

Leave your inhibitions at home! You will not be disappointed. This is an excellent performance accomplished by the Stratford Festival. I did not see an empty seat in the house and all ages from 12 & up seemed to be there. It was surprising how little audience participation there was as compared to productions from the late 70’s and from the movie theatres; however, what participation there was, added to the overall show without drowning it out, and made this presentation what has become so popular in Stratford, namely “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. *

An iconic promo ad from 2016’s major R.H.P.S. tour

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“THE MUSIC MAN”; Stratford & Feore ace Meredith Wilson Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

Classical musician, arranger and composer Meredith Wilson’s iconic Broadway musical THE MUSIC MAN may take place in 1902 small-town Iowa; but conning, stings; greed & ‘Peter Principle’ politics are just as current and eternal as love. The play has all of these ingredients and director/choreographer Donna Feore makes this iteration her own. The choreography, immaculate direction and even the subtle little touches are not only effective, but seem contemporary.
Director Feore; ‘Prof. Harold Hill’; and a certain youngster named
Alexander Elliot are a powerhouse trio that own the production, but it is Feore’s input and focus that are a major contribution.

Daren A. Herbert & his River City adorables

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