T.O.’s MENDELSSOHN CHOIR spectacular in Haydn’s “CREATION” Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
Last night, the near capacity audience at Koerner Hall stepped out of the reality of today’s world of global waste and desecration to celebrate the wonders of life on this planet. The Creation, an opera-like oratorio by Franz Josef Haydn, was written at a time when the Genesis story was unquestioned. Nevertheless, in 2016, it inspired the audience to consider the “six day” evolution from the chaos of nothingness to our glorious world minus the industrial pollution, human tragedies, and global warfare.       Photo courtesy of Frank Nagy

Choir & orchestra performing "CREATION"

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5 @ the First – Sunny Music for a Spring Afternoon Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
       String Extravaganza V was the penultimate concert in the 5 @ the First series – featuring Yehonatan Berick & Csaba Koczo on violin, Caitlin Boyle & Theresa Rudolph on the viola, and cellists Rachel Desoer & Rachel Mercer. Livia Coburn, a Bachelor of Music student at the University of Toronto currently studying under Shauna Rolston, opened with the prelude and gigue from Bach’s Suite #3 in C major on the cello. She is a very accomplished cellist and played the Bach with technical ability and understanding.

guest soloist Livia Coburn, post-concert

Guest soloist Livia Coburn; post-concert

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H.P.O.’s season finale – the Tchaikovsky 4th. Reply

Review by Ailine Hessreviewer Ailine Hess
      The Hamilton Philharmonic closed its season last evening, April 16, 2016, with an audience pleasing finale of Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony in f minor.  The concert was conducted by Eric Paetkau, a guest for the evening.  Maestro Paetkau is regularly the Music Director of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra and is the Founder and Music Director of group of 27, a Toronto ensemble.  He has wide experience in leading Canadian ensembles and his musical strengths were amply exhibited in last night’s concert.
The programme opened with a performance of Elgar’s 1892 Serenade for Strings in e minor.

The conductor in a studious & pensive moment

The conductor in a studious & pensive moment

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Ensemble Made in Canada – a superb quartet Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell
     The season’s final event in the Hamilton Conservatory for the Arts was a truly lovely chamber concert, featuring an afternoon of Mozart, Mendelssohn and Schumann, played by a superb quartet called Ensemble Made in Canada (EMIC). The players – Angela Park, piano; Elissa Lee, violin; Sharon Wei, viola and Rachel Mercer, cello – have played together for over ten years and bring a wealth of experience and a shared love of chamber music. They are each superb musicians who have taught master classes and lectured at Universities in both Canada and the United States.

Quartet members Mercer; Wei; Park & Lee

Quartet members Mercer; Wei; Park & Lee

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TORONTO SYMPHONY shows its colours! Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
      The Toronto Symphony Orchestra presented a star-studded line-up of world-class performers last evening at Roy Thomson Hall. Guest conductor Thomas Søndergård and pianist Francesco Piemontesi elevated a program that brought out the virtuosity, versatility and range of orchestral colours of Canada’s leading symphony orchestra.  The program began with Kati Agócs’ Perpetual Summer. Agócs describes herself as a Canadian/American/Hungarian composer. She introduced her Perpetual Summer as a musical commentary on the apocalyptic effects of global warming, using a huge battery of percussion, complete with three gongs, a giant mallet, and a box-like drum.

Piemontesi performing with the TSO

Piemontesi & the TSO         Photo by Malcolm Cook

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Pianist PAUL LEWIS provides romantic clarity Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
            British pianist, Paul Lewis, is one of the finest of his generation. In his recent performance – the fourth of The Invesco Piano Concert Series at Koerner Hall; he captured the essence of each composer with a simple clarity, an understated elegance, and a delicacy in the tender moments -all too rare. As a result, the contrasting power of the large moments was all more effective. Lewis was in complete command of each and every note.
Lewis is known for his outstanding recordings of the Beethoven and Schubert sonatas as well as his frequent appearances with major orchestras in Europe and North America.

a pensive Paul Lewis

A pensive Paul Lewis

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