H.P.O.’s season finale – the Tchaikovsky 4th. Reply

Review by Ailine Hessreviewer Ailine Hess
      The Hamilton Philharmonic closed its season last evening, April 16, 2016, with an audience pleasing finale of Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony in f minor.  The concert was conducted by Eric Paetkau, a guest for the evening.  Maestro Paetkau is regularly the Music Director of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra and is the Founder and Music Director of group of 27, a Toronto ensemble.  He has wide experience in leading Canadian ensembles and his musical strengths were amply exhibited in last night’s concert.
The programme opened with a performance of Elgar’s 1892 Serenade for Strings in e minor.

The conductor in a studious & pensive moment

The conductor in a studious & pensive moment

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Ensemble Made in Canada – a superb quartet Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell
     The season’s final event in the Hamilton Conservatory for the Arts was a truly lovely chamber concert, featuring an afternoon of Mozart, Mendelssohn and Schumann, played by a superb quartet called Ensemble Made in Canada (EMIC). The players – Angela Park, piano; Elissa Lee, violin; Sharon Wei, viola and Rachel Mercer, cello – have played together for over ten years and bring a wealth of experience and a shared love of chamber music. They are each superb musicians who have taught master classes and lectured at Universities in both Canada and the United States.

Quartet members Mercer; Wei; Park & Lee

Quartet members Mercer; Wei; Park & Lee

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TORONTO SYMPHONY shows its colours! Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
      The Toronto Symphony Orchestra presented a star-studded line-up of world-class performers last evening at Roy Thomson Hall. Guest conductor Thomas Søndergård and pianist Francesco Piemontesi elevated a program that brought out the virtuosity, versatility and range of orchestral colours of Canada’s leading symphony orchestra.  The program began with Kati Agócs’ Perpetual Summer. Agócs describes herself as a Canadian/American/Hungarian composer. She introduced her Perpetual Summer as a musical commentary on the apocalyptic effects of global warming, using a huge battery of percussion, complete with three gongs, a giant mallet, and a box-like drum.

Piemontesi performing with the TSO

Piemontesi & the TSO         Photo by Malcolm Cook

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Pianist PAUL LEWIS provides romantic clarity Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
            British pianist, Paul Lewis, is one of the finest of his generation. In his recent performance – the fourth of The Invesco Piano Concert Series at Koerner Hall; he captured the essence of each composer with a simple clarity, an understated elegance, and a delicacy in the tender moments -all too rare. As a result, the contrasting power of the large moments was all more effective. Lewis was in complete command of each and every note.
Lewis is known for his outstanding recordings of the Beethoven and Schubert sonatas as well as his frequent appearances with major orchestras in Europe and North America.

a pensive Paul Lewis

A pensive Paul Lewis

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‘OPUS EIGHT’ creates a choral wonder Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
         Hammer Baroque presented a concert of 16th century masterpieces from northern Europe called Tous Les Regretz, featuring the superb singers, Opus 8, on March 19th, 2016. The sizeable audience loved the polyphonic, contrapuntal music of the long ago sung acapella by the eight accomplished musicians who obviously enjoyed themselves and had great respect for and love of the music. Opus 8 features sopranos Jana Miller & Clara MacCallum Fraser; Rebecca Claborn and Simon Honeyman, altos; with tenors Peter Mowat, & Robert Busiakiewicz plus David Roth, baritone; and Sean Nix, bass. They are all wonderful singers.

the members of "OPUS 8"

the members of “OPUS 8”

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H.P.O. & Cirque de la Symphonie; “airs above the ground” Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

In traditional equestrian Dressage, the pinnacle demonstration is labeled “Airs above the ground”. The same sobriquet could certainly be attached to last evening’s Hamilton Philharmonic concert with the acclaimed quintet – CIRQUE de SYMPHONY whose routines boggles the mind and fascinates the viewer. Through fourteen musical selections, the acrobatic interpretations of the orchestral pieces were superb examples of entertaining theatre. However, acknowledging the evening was a symphonic concert event, some of the works were performed without distraction, more on this later.

A soaring duet

A soaring duet; Holt & Fedortchev

A high-flying Vitalii Buza

A high-flying Vitalii Buza

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