H.P.O. and “Cherish The Ladies” Reply

Review by Kim Wessel

The audience was waiting with anticipation and everyone was filled with excitement waiting for the show to start. Guest conductor Martin MacDonald came out and started us off with “The Irish Washerwoman” by Anderson. I have to say that Martin was quite the jokester in his comments tonight. He was telling us how he isn’t Irish and he hopes that just because he is a Scotsman that they don’t drag him off the stage. And, just so that everyone is aware, one concert (not tonight) he actually conducted while wearing a kilt, and he let us all know that they are really warm, not drafty. Unlike a true Scotsman, he wore bicycle shorts underneath.

Conductor McDonald & critic Kim Wessel

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M.S.O.; Third audition concert Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

The third candidate aspiring to the podium of the Mississauga Symphony is Misha Roháč; a Torontonian conductor whose background is Czechoslovakian. Understandably, the program featured two works by Smetana; three dances from his ‘Bartered Bride’, and the Sarka from Ma Vlast. This latter work translates as My Fatherland and is an excerpt from his Moldau suite. Another excerpt from Moldau is the melody for ‘Hatikvah’; Israel’s National Anthem which means ‘The Hope’. Both works carry a strong emotional yet musical theme.

Roháč’s style is somewhat posturizing; his address to the audience repetitious and non-educational, but his control of the orchestra is obvious. There were some discernible technical blunders in the first two works, but not noticeable for the remainder of the concert. The maestro is focused and almost pedantic in exhorting his version and arrangement from his musicians. More…

Oakville Ensemble’s take on Handel’s Messiah Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell

reviewer_JudithLast night at St. John’s United Church in Oakville we were treated to Messiah sung by a choir of 16 voices and an orchestra of 9 players comprising the Oakville Ensemble. Being used to hearing Messiah sung by large choirs with full orchestras I expected this to be Messiah lite, instead it was Messiah clear. The singers were all professionals who enunciated beautifully and the small size of the choir meant that the story line came through very clearly, yet were capable of producing volume when required.

Director Stephane Potvin wrote of the conflicting emotions he hears in Messiah—despair, hope, sadness, rage, fear, love, and passion. His interpretation explores all these emotions and gives a performance of both darkness and light. The first part, which deals with the birth and ministry of Christ, is fairly light and hopeful. This is followed by the much darker second part – the derision, flogging and crucifixion. We hear anger and fury contrasted with a light reading of ‘All We Like Sheep’ then back to darkness with a stunning rendition of ‘He Trusted in God’. The second section ended with a rousing ‘Hallelujah’ chorus which the audience loved.

The final section is the resurrection of Christ and begins with the hauntingly beautiful ‘I Know My Redeemer Liveth’; includes ‘The Trumpet Shall Sound’; and ends with the joyous ‘Worthy is The Lamb’ and the wonderfully grandiose ‘Amen’.

The soloists – soprano Catherine D’Addario; Erika Bailey- alto; the tenor voice of Michael P.Taylor,; and Bob Knight- bass; all have lovely, well-trained voices that are certainly suited to baroque music. Instead of using a piano as so often happens, the orchestra utilized Lynne Honsberger on Continuo which gave a genuine baroque sound to the score. This was a very enjoyable evening of very clear Messiah.

Oakville Ensemble’s next concert is geared to St. Valentine’s Day and can be heard at St. John’s United Church, 262 Randall Street, on Saturday February 11tth, 2012 at 7.30pm and on Sunday February 12th, 2012 at 3pm at Mary Mother of God, 2745 North Ridge Trail. Both venues are located in Oakville.

The Genius of Handel, interpreted by the O.C.O. Reply

Review by Terry Gaisin

Saturday evening was two hours of Handel, what a treat! This genius learned at a very young age to compose, play violin, oboe, organ & harpsichord. If being successful at his music endeavours wasn’t enough, his pushy father insisted he study law at University. After one year of law school- against his father’s wishes he accepted a position as violinist & harpsichordist at the Hamburg Opera House. When Prinz Georg of Germany became King George II of England, he took Handel to Britain where he became a citizen in 1727 and a celebrated composer. He was so admired in his adopted country that on his death (April 14th, 1759) he was given a state funeral, and buried in the Poets’ Corner of Westminster Abbey.

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