Windermere String Quartet –part of the Hammer Series Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell

As part of the Hammer Baroque series of concerts the Windermere String Quartet played three string quartets by teenaged composers. The concert was called ‘Young Blood’ and featured Mozart, Arriaga and Schubert. The players of the Windermere String Quartet, Elizabeth Loewen Andrews & Michelle Odorico, violins, Anthony Rapoport, viola and cellist Laura Jones, were seated in the centre of the room with the near capacity audience circled around them. This gave the concert an air of being in a large living room, which is how these works would have been originally heard.
Mozart was 17 when he wrote a String Quartet in B flat (K172).

The members of Windermere Quartet, performing

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“Cirque de la Philharmonique ét la O.P.H.”, Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

Editor’s note: -”O.P.H.” or bilingually ‘orchestre philharmonique d’Hamilton’
The Hamilton Philharmonic offered two guests in what was an amazing evening and a stupendously entertaining one. On the podium was Kitchener’s Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser , with the renowned Cirque de la Symphonie performing on stage. The HPO was in top form; the conductor was in perfect synch with the musicians; (& vice versa). The ½ dozen Cirque members astounded; diverted & astonished the audience. Guilty admission: – this scribe uttered way too many ‘Oy vey‘s’ at what appeared to be certain-death ministrations.
The program was dedicated to the compositions created for, or used, by Hollywood.

Cirque de la Symphonie & maestro Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser -post concert

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“Messiah”, Bach Elgar’s 2017 version Reply

Review by Judith Caldwell
Messiah is an event that defines the Christmas season. The Bach Elgar Choir has been singing for 113 years and have offered the oratorio through most of those years including 2017. Guest conductor Howard Dyck, with soloists Agnes Zsigovics, soprano, mezzo Allyson McHardy, Colin Ainsworth, tenor, and bassist Sean Watson, the choir, and a 19-piece orchestra presented the full version of Messiah on Saturday night and a shorter sing-along version on Sunday afternoon at Melrose United Church. The church has good acoustics but the pews are quite uncomfortable for a long concert. though it was written as an Easter Oratorio, it tells of the birth, life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Bach Elgar interpreting Handel’s MESSIAH

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HPO’s “Home for the holidays” extravaganza evening Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
The mark of a top-drawer orchestra is its ability to successfully interpret a range of genres and under diverse conductors. The Hamilton Phil’ exhibited both these talents in presenting a cornucopia of familiar melodies of the season, and under the guest baton of Lucas Waldin of the Edmonton Symphony.
Regardless of one’s religious background or affiliation, the ubiquitous Christmas music is familiar to anyone with a radio or a visit to the mall or grocery store. To make an on-stage reprise thoroughly enjoyable surely is the mark of genius. Last night’s concert certainly achieved this level accolade on three different aspects – aural; visual and imaginative.

Heather Bambrick; Lucas Waldin and the H.P.O.

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TBSO Launches Into the Wonder of Mozart & Martinis Reply

Review by Sylvie Di Leonardo
The Thunder Bay Symphony Orchestra hosted their annual cocktail fundraiser Mozart and Martinis at Bight Restaurant last week. The symphony musicians appeared in chamber groups to perform the works of Mozart and his contemporaries in an intimate, elegantly decorated setting at the waterfront. Carefully-crafted cocktails including the Salzburg Spritz and Salieri’s Revenge were accompanied by artisanal appetizers, curated specially for the event by Bight’s Bianca Garofalo.
This evening’s program began with the overture course and
Salzburg Symphonies No. 1 followed by the Flute Quartet in D, K. 285. The uplifting melodies of the third movement Rondeau  were accompanied by aperol and orange flavors,

The Thunder Bay orchestra patrons enjoying the wines, nibbles & food

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“HPO Remembers”, consulare tenebris, solennes adque arcebant * Reply

Review by Danny & Terry Gaisin
The serendipitous alignment of Nov. 11th ’17 falling on a Saturday meant having the Hamilton Philharmonic present it’s traditional Remembrance Day event after the emotional catharsis of the city’s & (Country’s conventional) recognizance of the day’s significance. With the ritual and pomp of the Regimental Band of the ‘RHLI’s’ accompanied by a pipe band opening the evening, the two novel and contemporary compositions, the mood and mind-set of the audience was posited and ready for Mozart’s Requiem Mass, performed by the orchestra; 4 soloists and the Bach-Elgar Choir.

l-r: – Mercer; Nesrallah; New; Wiliford & Fanning performing the ‘Tuba Mirum’

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