“You say tomato I say …”; a W.E.S.T. reprise Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
Six years ago, a couple, Jeff Kahn & Annabelle Gurwitch wrote a biographical comedy about their dating period and fifteen-year marriage. As a play, there are two performers and the audience somewhat sits as a marriage counselor hearing the diverse (and somewhat revisionist) recollections of that 20-year span, and the surprising reversal of usual male/female roles and attitudes. Portrayed by an actual married couple (23 years) Michael and Pudgy Quast try to be the epitome of the personalities they must represent. Succeed they certainly do!
W.E.S.T. stages a new & improved version of “You Say Tomato; I say ‘SHUT UP’

An intense & opposing moment portrayed by the Quasts

An intense & opposing moment portrayed by the Quasts

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“Work is the Curse of the Drinking Class” Reply

Review by Michael Piscitelli
reviewer-mOscar Wilde has always been one of my favourite playwrights, and I love learning more about his, tragically short, life. A wordsmith with a silver tongue as sharp as a finely-honed sword of legend, Wilde’s wit would winnow any wanton or worrisome weight the world over. Alliteration aside, I found myself finding out more about Wilde in the hour and a half than any lecturer would hold my attention would in an entire semester of school ever did.
Introducing Mr. Wilde is a brief and somewhat bare-bones sum up of the life Oscar Wilde led from birth in the mid 1850’s to his death in France at the turn of the century.

Titley portraying Oscar Wilde

Titley portraying Oscar Wilde

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O.A.R.’s “THE TOP TEN” (plus plus), 2016 Reply

Editorial & Administrative opinions
There have been previous years where due to tie-votes, our ARTS REVIEW’s TOP TEN list has, in actuality contained 12 or even 14 items. This year has seen such a plethora of worthy efforts of entertainment that the final selection process was daunting. So, for the first time, O.A.R.  will also specify an ‘Honourable Mention’ (sort of Silver or Bronze medal) category.

THEATRE UNLIMITED, This successful Miss ‘a community group undertook staging the musical version of Monty Python’s SPAMALOT. The droll puns and one-liners still abound but with the addition of musical numbers, it’s even enhanced. As we wrote in our review “– an awesome giggle from start to finish and we loved it!”

the candidates for work as part of A CHORUS LINE

the candidates for work as part of Stratford’s “A CHORUS LINE”

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A Lad, His Sourpuss and a Panto Reply

Review by Michael Piscitellireviewer-m
Pantomime! The art of doing a fairy tale with numerous modern twist and a multitude of pop culture references. No matter your age, actively booing the bad guy is always fun and the chance that you might get to go on stage is always an honour (if you look like you’re under the age of 10 that is). I’ve personally loved panto ever since I was introduced to it in my elementary school days and reintroduced in university as a viable source of theatre and art in its own respect

Aladdin's assorted friends & foes

Aladdin’s assorted friends & foes

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a BIG (& important) thing for “little people” Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
This past weekend, WEST END STUDIO THEATRE co-opted Christine & Lisa Brkich’s TWO SISTERS DANCE PROJECT to present a seasonally oriented short recital geared towards the three to 10-year old category. Both WEST and our ARTS REVIEW fervently believe that instilling an appreciation for live performances can never begin too early. We brought our own ‘kiddlies’ (ages 6 & 5) for their first exposure to the genre. To say they were fascinated and enthralled would be understatement. They sat mesmerized!

The "LEGWARMERS" percussion team!

The “LEGWARMERS” percussion team!

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“DOGFIGHT”; a visceral picture of war Reply

Review by Terry GaisinreviewerETG
Six years ago, an off-Broadway musical about the Viet Nam War went mainstream. SHERIDAN’s theatre arts faculty brings all the pathos, transformations, and forced maturity that the war effected. The play is emphasized by song and dance; thus, the dialogue is transitory but exacting and severe. The phrase ‘DOGFIGHT’ usually refers to an aerial battle between fighter planes, but is occasionally used as the male counterpart to a struggle between women. It also represents a cruel U.S. Marine game in which ‘jarheads’ on leave pool funds to award whomever brought the ugliest date to a party.

The marines heading for leave, & the girls they want to meet

The marines heading for their ‘Frisco leave; & the girls they want to meet

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