Windermere String Quartet –part of the Hammer Series 1

Review by Judith Caldwell

As part of the Hammer Baroque series of concerts the Windermere String Quartet played three string quartets by teenaged composers. The concert was called ‘Young Blood’ and featured Mozart, Arriaga and Schubert. The players of the Windermere String Quartet, Elizabeth Loewen Andrews & Michelle Odorico, violins, Anthony Rapoport, viola and cellist Laura Jones, were seated in the centre of the room with the near capacity audience circled around them. This gave the concert an air of being in a large living room, which is how these works would have been originally heard.
Mozart was 17 when he wrote a String Quartet in B flat (K172).

The members of Windermere Quartet, performing

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“A theatrical ‘Double, Double’” Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
Baseball has it’s ‘double header’; opera ‘s “Pagliacci” & “Cavalleria Rusticana” are always performed as a duo; and theatre has the two one-act efforts – Shaffer’s BLACK COMEDY and Stoppard’s THE REAL INSPECTOR HOUND performed sequentially. Oakville’s Drama Series has both entries directed by Jeff Morrison; so he must work under two distinct mindsets and two different cast teams. A challenge, but one that is well met.
Black Comedy is unusual in that it is a ‘reversed lighting’ process, i.e. the stage is lit for the major period of a blackout, but is in almost total darkness when the power comes on.

Activity in the (supposed to be) Dark!

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A ‘twofer’ operatic opportunity from the C.O.C. Reply

Review by Michael Piscitelli
This past week, I have been fortunate enough to go to two operas’ in a row. Both were comedic operas that took very different approaches to comedy, of black comedy and slapstick. For Richard Strauss’ 1933 comedic “Arabella”, director Tim Albery tried his hand at making it into a black comedy. Unfortunately, it fell flat, and made it more of a mellow drama (I’m fully aware of my choice of words) than a black comedy. A show about absurd ideas about love, mistaken identity and poor uses of money it’s sure to have many jokes sung throughout the piece.

                             Erin Wall as “ARABELLA”

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“Russian celebrations”, a superlative HPO evening 1

Review by Danny Gaisin

Once upon a time, there was a thing called a record player. Round vinyl platters could be stacked up, and thus preferent music choices could be enjoyed. The HPO’s director Gemma New somehow was able to select four of this scribe’s favourites. So, if a reader gleans a little bias in the following…please forgive me.
A capriccio is defined as a whimsical or prankish work. Methinks Rimsky-Korsakov interpreted the meaning to emphasize the lighthearted aspect rather than a joke idiom because the work is a pure joy – both to perform and to hear. The H.P.O. gave all its five sections a distinct image

   Chalifour & New performing Tchaikovsky’s violin concerto

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“The Madness of George III”; SHAW’s kindly take. Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin 

George Fredrick Hanover, King George 3rd, ruled Great Britain for the 60 years between 1760 & 1820, a 6-decade run.  That certainly outlived the Alan Bennett 20-year film depicting him before going into reruns. Poor George III & his military minions won the 7-Years War but lost the American colonies, so a 500% ERA statistically isn’t too bad.  SHAW’s director Kevin Bennett has staged a rather sympathetic interpretation of the movie by emphasizing the horrific medical practices of the time plus the political shenanigans within his court. His son & heir, the Whig/Tory battles; and the struggle for influence are all highly focused.    Photo by David Cooper

Tom McCamus & Chick Reid; aka HRH’s George III & Charlotte

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“SUPERMARKET”; play deserves in-depth analysis Reply

co-review by Sylvie Di Leonardo and Michael Piscitelli
Artscape Youngsplace, frequently a haven for multi-media mavens, is transformed into SUPERMARKET for the final-year studio artists from the University of Scarborough.
“If you think about the nature of a supermarket, it’s a place with an eclectic variety of items placed together, especially now that its all one-stop shopping,” says fourth-year contributor Kristina Zaja. “Then if you think about conceptual art and doing conceptual art at the senior level in a university, we’re all working on our own concepts…and since we’re all creating within the same social/cultural time; but are quite different because of where our inspirations take us, in a sense this is like a supermarket of an art exhibition.”
Creative student playbill for “SUPERMARKET” More…