Britten’s “Paul Bunyan” gets a rare performance Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
              Paul Bunyan, the operetta by Benjamin Britten and W.H Auden, was performed last night by The U of T Faculty of Music’s Opera Division, the second of four performances at the MacMillan Theatre. It was a lavish production with approximately 65 on stage including over 30 in solo and ensemble roles; a chorus made up of the MacMillan Singers, and an orchestra of 50 players efficiently conducted by Sandra Horst. The sets and lighting by Fred Perruzza gave an expansive sense of the forest and lumber camp with ample space for the large cast.    Photo by Richard Lu

Paul Bunyan's on-stage Christmas Party scene

Paul Bunyan’s on-stage Christmas Party scene

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“The Seagull”, or – ‘flipping someone the bird!’ Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
            One’s thoughts and opinions especially those prejudicial, biased or politically incorrect remain ones own unless spoken, or in my case written. Then they are no longer private. Anton Chekov’s 1896 play “THE SEAGULL” is not on my list of enjoyable theatre presentations. There are no admirable individuals …just the opposite, and I can see as if in a mirror my own warts as well as those of people close by for whom I bear no predilection. That stated, Theatre Erindale’s production will be critiqued strictly on thespian ability. Photo by Jim Smagata

Hefford, Weichert & Grant in an almost idyllic social moment

Hefford, Weichert & Grant in an almost idyllic social moment

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“Jekyll & Hyde; the Musical”, CCMP stages a hit. Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

reviewerDJG            Like most of my generation; R.L. Stevenson’s ‘Treasure Island’; “Kidnapped”, and Master of Ballantrae were de rigeuer novels. His ‘Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde’ was considered somewhat verboten for young minds. Understandable; because the plot deals with Dis-associative Identity Disorder; or ‘split personality’. The psychological duality or dichotomy of societal morality vs. human instinct is just as pervasive today as it was in 1886 when R.L.S. wrote his book. The Wildhorn/Cuden/ Bricusse musical interpretation is now 25 years old.

The full cast of JEKYLL & HYDE, the Musical

The full cast of “JEKYLL & HYDE, the Musical”

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World-Class piano trio born! Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R

Canadian mega-star violinist, Karen Gomyo, returned to Toronto’s Koerner Hall after a two-year absence, in a newly-formed piano trio that included the Swiss cellist, Christian Poltéra and Finnish pianist, Juho Pohjonen. Thirty-four-year-old Gomyo has been performing with major orchestras in North America and Europe since her youth, and is now striking out on a tour with her husband, cellist Christian Poltéra, and pianist Juho Pohjonen, in search of musical balance and the intimacy of chamber music performance.
The piano trio, yet unnamed, is world-class. Both Poltéra and Pohjonen have notable international careers.

Gomyo, Poltera & Phojonen, post-concert

The trio; post-concert

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“Salt-Water Moon” shines bright at factory Reply

Review by Ellen S. JaffeReviewerEllen S.
          Beautifully imagined and staged by director Ravi Jain, the Factory Theatre’s production of “Salt-Water Moon” by David French, will go straight to the audience’s heart. The play’s two characters, Mary Snow, played with delicate strength by Mayko Nguyen, and Jake Mercer, portrayed with charismatic vitality by Kawa Ada, are in a sense “naked” on stage—dressed in ordinary clothes, with no props or scenery except for fifty or more candles in glass jars, spread across the stage like stars and carefully lit by Mary as the play opens.

the protagonists of SALT WATER MOON having an intimate moment

the protagonists of SALT WATER MOON having an intimate moment

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Buffalo, NY’s Kavinoky Play – a conversation starter Reply

reviewerJudith Robinson
         The City of Conversation, at the Kavinoky Theatre in Buffalo, is a must-see presentation. The actors are strong—the plot stimulating and the emotional tension riveting. The backdrop for the drama, the fight between the Democrats and the Republicans between 1979 and 2009, is like watching Trump versus Hillary. When lead actor, Hester Ferris, a Washington socialite and Ted Kennedy supporter, played by Kristen Tripp Kelley, pits off against young upstart Republican and Reagan backer, Anna Fitzgerald, portrayed by Aleks Malejs, fireworks fly.
Photo courtesy of Kahle Bostaph

A tense on-stage political dialogue

                                                      A tense on-stage political dialogue

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