A Play to remember, at the Tarragon Reply

Review by Ellen S. JaffeReviewerEllen S.
         “I can’t forget everything!” exclaims R.H. Thomson, in an impeccable, moving, dignified, and at times, funny performance as Edouard Beauchemin, a professor stricken with Alzheimer’s disease in “You Will Remember Me” at the Tarragon Theatre.  Please, don’t forget to see this wonderful play- a co-production with Studio 180, skillfully translated by Bobby Theodore from Francois Archambault’s Tu te souviendras de moi.
Director Joel Greenburg creates a deeply human, well-paced production, with a superb cast. Drawn into Edouard’s struggle with memory and identity is Nancy Palk, portraying with compassion and strength – his wife, Madeleine.      Photo courtesy of Cylla von Tiedemann

Thomson & cast members of "You will remember Me"

Thomson & cast members of “You will remember Me”

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ALCINA, a baroque opera with relevance Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
             It is almost impossible to attend any event involving students from The Glenn Gould School (GGS) and experience anything less than a completely professional performance. Such was the case, March 18th, at the Royal Conservatory’s production of Handel’s “Alcina”, in Koerner Hall. If this had been hockey, it would have been a Canadian championship junior team winning another international gold medal. GGS has indeed become a mecca for the professional training of musicians from around the globe. As such, the expectation for great music precedes any event at the school.
     Photo by Nicola Betts

Irina Medvedeva as "Morgana" in ALCINA

Irina Medvedeva as “Morgana” in ALCINA

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“2-Birds…but FIVE stones!” 1

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
            Top ten listings are ubiquitous; even the ARTS REVIEW publishes an annual re-cap. When one Google’s ™ North American registers of most-acclaimed music schools, such names as Oberlin; Eastman; Colburn; the Manhattan School; Ann Arbor and Julliard come immediately to mind. Always included in the register is Boston’s Berklee, whose graduates include Bruce Cockburn, Diana Krall, Quincy Jones; Branford Marsalis and all of the ‘Imagine Dragons’ ensemble. Berklee is the world’s largest independent jazz & modern music school with students from around the globe.

The 2-Birds Band in performance

The 2-Birds Band in performance

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H.P.O. & Cirque de la Symphonie; “airs above the ground” Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin

In traditional equestrian Dressage, the pinnacle demonstration is labeled “Airs above the ground”. The same sobriquet could certainly be attached to last evening’s Hamilton Philharmonic concert with the acclaimed quintet – CIRQUE de SYMPHONY whose routines boggles the mind and fascinates the viewer. Through fourteen musical selections, the acrobatic interpretations of the orchestral pieces were superb examples of entertaining theatre. However, acknowledging the evening was a symphonic concert event, some of the works were performed without distraction, more on this later.

A soaring duet

A soaring duet; Holt & Fedortchev

A high-flying Vitalii Buza

A high-flying Vitalii Buza

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Britten’s “Paul Bunyan” gets a rare performance Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
              Paul Bunyan, the operetta by Benjamin Britten and W.H Auden, was performed last night by The U of T Faculty of Music’s Opera Division, the second of four performances at the MacMillan Theatre. It was a lavish production with approximately 65 on stage including over 30 in solo and ensemble roles; a chorus made up of the MacMillan Singers, and an orchestra of 50 players efficiently conducted by Sandra Horst. The sets and lighting by Fred Perruzza gave an expansive sense of the forest and lumber camp with ample space for the large cast.    Photo by Richard Lu

Paul Bunyan's on-stage Christmas Party scene

Paul Bunyan’s on-stage Christmas Party scene

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“The Seagull”, or – ‘flipping someone the bird!’ Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDGcolor
            One’s thoughts and opinions especially those prejudicial, biased or politically incorrect remain ones own unless spoken, or in my case written. Then they are no longer private. Anton Chekov’s 1896 play “THE SEAGULL” is not on my list of enjoyable theatre presentations. There are no admirable individuals …just the opposite, and I can see as if in a mirror my own warts as well as those of people close by for whom I bear no predilection. That stated, Theatre Erindale’s production will be critiqued strictly on thespian ability. Photo by Jim Smagata

Hefford, Weichert & Grant in an almost idyllic social moment

Hefford, Weichert & Grant in an almost idyllic social moment

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