“LOVE, LOSS & WHAT I WORE”; a play even for guys! Reply

Review by Danny Gaisin
reviewerDGcolor

“Coming out of the closet” has a popular & current connotation of publicly divulging or acknowledging one’s sexual preference; it also could mean a laconic critical description of Nora & Dalia Ephron’s play on Beckerman’s book “Love, Loss & What I Wore”. Via the vehicle of monologues, five women portray twenty-eight characters as defined by their apposite wardrobes for the described periods. Understandably, there were less than a dozen males in the L.A.C. audience for Galahad‘s production under the direction of Yo Mustafa, & produced by Paul Groulx.

Glover;Lander;Brokenshire;Fisher;Dagenais & McCabe-Bennett in L.L.& WIW

Glover;Lander;Brokenshire;Fisher;Dagenais & McCabe-Bennett in L.L.& WIW

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“Chimerica” explores US-China relations Reply

Review by Judith RobinsonreviewerJudith Robinson

Director, Chris Abraham, does an excellent job of tying together the threads of the various plot lines and underlying themes in Chimerica – a co-production between Canadian Stage and the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre – about the complex and tenuous relationship between China and the United States. In 2012, American journalist, Joe Schofield, played by Evan Buliung attempts to track down a man who stood in front of a row of tanks in China’s Tiananmen Square, in 1989. Schofield is an anti-hero who continually drops the ball, both personally and professionally, causing the audience to lose interest in his quest.

the political protagonists debating in "CHIMERICA"

The political protagonists debating in “CHIMERICA”

 

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‘THE JUDAS KISS’; Hare’s bio-tale about Oscar Wilde Reply

Review by Judith RobinsonreviewerJudith Robinson
         David Hare is the finest, British, living playwright. And his play, The Judas Kiss, playing at the Ed Mirvish Theatre in Toronto, is perhaps his best. In tracing the story of Oscar Wilde’s betrayal by his young lover, Lord Alfred Douglas, Hare succeeds, not only in skillfully telling a true tale of passionate intrigue, but in touching the soul of what it means to love.
The agony which Wilde, masterfully played by Rupert Everett, goes through, is something most of us can identify with: wondering what a loved one wants and figuring out how to please them;    photo by Cylla von Tiedemann

MacAninch; Everett; & Rowe in "JUDAS KISS"

MacAnnich; Everett; & Rowe in “JUDAS KISS”

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“The CRACKWALKER”, has a haunting voice Reply

Review by Ellen S. JaffeReviewerEllen S.
       Playwright, Judith Thompson, directs the Factory Theatre’s haunting production of her own playThe Crackwalker”. Originally produced in 1980, this is Thompson’s first play, inspired by a mask-making class she took in theatre school; and by her summer job working for the Ministry of Community and Social Services in Kingston.  It is the final play in the Factory Theatre’s current season, “Naked: Canadian Classics Reimagined.”
The actors portray the kind of characters who often fall through society’s cracks – the people who appear in newspaper headlines but with whom most of us have no real contact.    Photo by  Michael Joseph

Armstrong; Joffe: Gale & Bonnell in THE CRACKWALKER

      Armstrong; Joffe: Gale & Bonnell in “THE CRACKWALKER”

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Toronto Mendelssohn Choir Soars! Reply

Review by David RichardsReviewerDave-R
Good Friday at St. Paul’s Catholic Church was the perfect day and place for a concert by the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. The choir made wonderful use of the church’s magnificent acoustics, not to mention the elaborately decorated sanctuary. The concert of sacred music in such beautiful surroundings, on this special day, made the spirits soar. If Good Friday was meant to send a message of peace, hope and love to mankind, then the Mendelssohn Choir was an inspirational messenger.
William Byrd’s, Mass in Four Voices, comprised the first half of a program of sacred music.    Photo courtesy of  Brian Summers

Mendelssohn choir members rehearsing

Mendelssohn choir members rehearsing

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“iBLITHE” a modern take on Coward’s ‘Blithe Spirit’ Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
            For a Hamiltonian, venturing into Leslieville is an act of empirical courage. The miniscule Red Sandcastle Theatre on Queen St. E. invited us to see a contemporary interpretation of Noel Coward’s only venture into the realm of a ghost story. The plot and concept is still the same; but the approach is an update to current mores and props. Methinks even Coward would approve of Rosemary Doyle’s improvisations. “iBLITHE” had the opening-night audience and yours truly in stitches.

l-r...  #1; Charles; Arcati; the Bradmans; & wife #2

l-r… wife #1; Charles; Mme.Arcati; the Bradmans; & wife #2

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