Cacophony in the Dollhouse Reply

Review by Michael PiscitellireviewerMichael P2
Doing your research for a play is crucial when performing.  Doing your research for seeing a piece of theatre; not so much. But I’ve been known to be wrong before.  Going in to a show blind can be either a blessing or a curse. On the one hand, you could end up experiencing a fantastic plot, with dynamic visual designs and action. Or you could end up witnessing something that may leave you confused and unsure of why you came in the first place. Or worse, wanting your money back.

An interpretive moment in "Dollhouse"

An interpretive moment in “Dollhouse”

More…

HAMMER BAROQUE, a talented musical nonet Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
Since the ARTS REVIEW started critiquing its presentations, word has definitely spread about the calibre of the Hammer Baroque series of concerts. There was a near capacity crowd for the Toronto Consort’s Hamilton performance of music from the court of the Italian Queen of France – Catherine de Medici (1519-’89). Catherine was the daughter of a French noblewoman, Madeleine de la Tour d’Auvergne, and Lorenzo de Medici and she was married at a young age to a French Prince who unexpectedly became King of France. As Queen, she was viewed with suspicion because of her Italian heritage, and derision because her father was ‘just a banker’, even though he was wealthier than the King.

the nonet (9-member) team of HAMMER BAROQUE

the nonet (9-member) team of HAMMER BAROQUE

More…

HPO’s tribute to the ‘Swing’ era…my times Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
Do the names ‘Dorsey; Goodman; Miller; Ellington; Shaw and Basie’ ring some reminiscent bells? If they do, you’re probably mature enough to remember the “Big Band Era” or SWING! As yours truly sits down to write this, my set of drum sticks ‘stolen’ from Gene Krupa, and some ancient pop-music trumpet sheets ‘borrowed’ from Eldridge are sitting on the desk, probably peering phantom-like over my shoulder. Incorporating 2/4 & 4/4 time; oversized orchestras and celebrity conductors; attending a ball or dance where any of these were performing was pure ‘crème de las crème apex society.

Vanhwvel (aka ol' Blueeyes) belting "Night & Day"

Vanhevel (aka ol’ Blue eyes) belting out “Night & Day”

More…

“GIBSON & SONS”, decidedly Oakville connection Reply

Review by Danny GaisinreviewerDJG
Oakville playwright Kristen Da Silva has written a new play that has already attracted attention. A nominee for 2016’s Pechect Family (Stage West) Comedy Award; it is the aptly named Oakville Players who have the honor of being the first team to put it on the boards. Under the meticulous direction of Angie Fyke; her impeccably selected cast of seven make this a continual giggle with quotable lines too numerous to list. There’s also some very touching and identifiable bits that make GIBSON & SONS hit a personal chord.

The folks of GIBSON & SONS

The folks of GIBSON & SONS

More…

“RABBIT HOLE”: grief & hope after a loss Reply

Review by Ellen S. JaffeReviewerEllen S.
            Kudos to Dundas Little Theatre for their production of Rabbit Hole, a Pulitzer prize-winning play by David Lindsay-Abaire. They have taken on a daring emotional challenge, and succeeded.  This play, dealing with one of the most poignant and painful griefs – the death of a child – is not an easy subject, but Abaire’s beautifully-crafted script and the skill of the actors and director Lana Borsellino bring the story to life, touching our hearts without sentimentality.
The play shows five characters each dealing with loss and grief in their own way. This causes conflict, but as the story develops, they begin to communicate more openly,

Nectaria Kardan & Gladys Glass in "RABBIT HOLE"

Nectaria Kordan & Gladys Glass in “RABBIT HOLE”

More…

Novel concert by “5@First” … Jazz Reply

Review by Judith CaldwellreviewerJudith
            For a total change of pace from their usual classical concerts, Five at the First offered jazz in the form of the Darren Sigesmund Strands Ensemble for the October concert. The ensemble is a Septet consisting of bandleader and composer of the music Darren Sigismund, trombone; vocals by Valeria Matzner; Luis Deniz, alto sax; vibraphonist Michael Davidson; Reg Schwager, guitar; Jim Vivian on bass and percussionist Ethan Ardelli, each of them has an impressive resume and musical credentials and some have worked with such jazz greats as Diana Krall and Peter Appleyard, so the talent on stage was impressive.

the STRANDS ENSEMBLE; post-concert

the STRANDS ENSEMBLE; post-concert

More…